Life in the USA: Cars

Life in the USA: Cars

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Most Americans get to work by car, 95 percent of American households own a car, and this is a model of living and moving in the USA.

Till the end of Second World War Americans lived in the small towns and big cities, almost half of them did not own cars but used public buses, trolleys, and trains. In the 1950-th appeared a surge in low-cost, mass-produced houses occurred outside cities to accommodate returning soldiers and their growing families. The new housing pattern was accompanied by the National Interstate Highway System, which was started in 1956. During the next 50 years, 46,876 miles (75,440 kilometers) of highways were built across America. All these facts lead to the amount of cars in the USA: in 2001, car ownership peaked (1.1 cars per licensed driver).

But this model of common usage and owning cars is not good for densely populated areas. New York City has the lowest rate of car ownership, with only 50 percent of households owning cars. Good sidewalks and public transit and safe bicycle networks are a priority in these cities. In July 2009, New York City completed the first phase of a plan to make the city friendlier to bicycles by adding 200 miles of bike lanes separated from car traffic within the city. Green Light for Midtown is the New York project, when were created special zones for pedestrian, bicycles in the squares areas and closed for automobiles two parts of Broadway.

The tendencies to change a car for urban transport or bicycle or go by foot are constant. By 2008, the average number of miles driven in the United States fell for the first time in history, declining 3.6 percent from 2007, and the number of trips by public transportation rose to a 50-year high.